The Palestinian Genocide is Right Under our Nose

Translated  by Katrina Hassan In Latina America, information and news from dictatorships is hard to come by thanks to technical limitations and repression. In the past, this information had to be extracted by foreign journalists. They had to jump over many hoops to do so. This is why so much was left in silence and the forgotten. In terms of technology, times have changed. The population can make use of their telephones. They can reproduce, in real time, what really happens in their countries in a matter a seconds. People sharing information gain time on the media as it wastes time…

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The Colombian Awakening

Translated  by Marvin Najarro In 2015 it was Guatemala, demonstrating against corruption on sunny Saturdays. Latin America was amazed to see the submissive and “chambona” Guatemalan society finally rising up after having elected a genocidal as president; they did not protest demanding justice for the victims of the genocide that they denied it took place, but against corruption. But it is better than nothing, given the circumstances of a very weak historical memory. They allowed themselves to be tricked, as in soccer “chilena” goal, when Jimmy Morales was made president, and after that, they by their own volition headed for the…

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The Bicycle With Which I Try to Emancipate Myself

Translated  by Katrina Hassan When the land lots were made and the dust was still in the air on the brand new streets of Ciudad Peronia, a family arrived and opened a tortilla shop and a bike rental business. To have those two businesses in a shanty town like this, full of poverty, these people had wealth. They had three indigenous employees that had three tortilla making shifts. The men of the house ran the bike rental business. They had dozens of bicycles. This was the beginning of the 90s. Nobody in the neighbourhood had money to rent a bike by…

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“Semitas” to soothe the soul

Translated  by Marvin Najarro “Grandma, speaking about ‘Comapa,’ do you know how  ‘semitas’ are made?” I asked my grandmother, after 17 years in the diaspora, of which even I was surprised. “How is it that, Negra?” I said to myself, “that you haven’t asked your grandmother the recipe for ‘semitas’ before.” My grandmother began to dictate the ingredients to me, for “semitas,” “pan de arroz,” “quesadillas” and “salporas.” I pulled out a sheet of paper and wrote them down.  “Figure out the sugar,” she told me, “add it depending on what your taste tells you. Depending on the amount of flour add…

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Liliana López Foresi: To be good journalist one must learn. One does not learn to be a good person.

Translated  by Katrina Hassan This article belongs to The Insurgent Women series Liliana López Foresi, is a reference point to commitment in journalism. Her journalism is not one that is bribed, or that destroys, but resists and is has solidarity when everything goes wrong. She is a myth, a legend of journalism that many of the Argentinian oligarchs have tried to fade out through time. If people think about ethical, humane, indispensable, responsible, gender focused journalism in Argentina, the sole representative is Liliana López Foresi. If Liliana López Foresi is so important for the journalistic feminine base and political opinion in…

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The Amnesia of a Defeated Country

Translated  by Marvin Najarro Without going any farther, there is the defeated country, which if we take into account all the things that happened during the dictatorship, at this point in time, instead of neoliberalism and forgetfulness, society should have opted for the rebuilding of its social fabric, imprisoning those who committed crimes against humanity, and the rebuilding of its infrastructure.    But instead, it is an emaciated country. The same vulturelike society has dedicated itself to deny the genocide; to denigrate the relatives of the victims of the Internal Armed Conflict; and to see with apathy how the state is dismantled…

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Gender Based Violence is a State Policy

Translated  by Resumen Latinoamericano, North America bureau Violence against women and the impoverished and exploited masses is a State policy in societies with neoliberal governments. Before the armed wing, there is the resource of religion, which emotionally manipulates the excluded but doubly violates women because of their gender. In the name of faith, protected by misogynist religions, many men exercise gender violence to the point of feminicide. This is not new, we are not discovering sugar water. But an absent state, infested with corruption, where machismo, misogyny, homophobia and patriarchy are systematically nurtured, is responsible for gender violence and its…

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Guatemala: A Dead Country

Translated  by Resumen Latinoamericano, North America bureau We should have a minimum of shame, since we have no courage. A minimum of indignation that takes us out of the social networks that puts up with everything and take to the streets that are witnesses of the country’s history. The convenience of a social network is beautiful, but that is just make-up, a varnish, verbiage, oratory; it does not bring about root changes and Guatemala is a rotting country.  It is the responsibility of the same mestizo and urban society, incapable of uniting with the native peoples in their enormous dignity and…

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Gender Violence is Policy of the State

Translated  by Katrina Hassan In societies with neoliberal governments, gender violence, mass poverty and exploitation are all policy of the State. Before the armed forces we have religion that manipulates the excluded ones with emotions and women get double the dose for their gender. In the name of faith, with protection from misogynistic religions, many men exert gender violence to such degree that they lead to feminicides. This is not new, it is not sliced bread. In an absent State, infested in corruption, where machismo propagates, misogyny, homophobia and the patriarchy are systematic, the State is the one responsible for gender…

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Kamala, a Light of Hope for Migrant Women?

Translated  by Katrina Hassan Today 20th of January 2021 has been a historic day in the United States, in which millions of women feel proud and emotional to see a woman become vice president. A Black and Asian woman no less. They feel proud because gender causes have no ideology. Kamala is there thanks to thousands of women in the history of this country. She is there thanks to the Ancestral ones, Blacks, Whites, Asians, Latinas, European and of course the Native women. She knows this very well and recognizes it publicly. She is very proud of it too. The system…

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The Woman With Kindness in Her Eyes

Translated  by Katrina Hassan I am concentrating reading my book when all of a sudden I see her appear. A tall and slim Asian woman, wearing a sumptuous winter coat. I go back to reading but I can’t concentrate, looking at her again. So much beauty in only one person. “How is that possible?” I ask myself, trying again to read my book. Besides such beauty, I sense, subtly, kindness. I see it in her eyes. I go back to my book, only to lower my head and pretend to read, because I have lost all my concentration. The slim woman…

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The Year of the Pandemic

Translated  by Marvin Najarro Due to the virus, this 2020 has been designated by many people as the cursed year. But it is only one among the thousands that exist; it is not the only one that kills, more people are killed, for example, by the lack of empathy. By turning a blind eye and feigning ignorance to what hits us head on: racism, classism and oblivion. Locking ourselves in our bubbles and keep them under lock and key, because everything that happens outside, what others experience, doesn’t concern us. That is why we see so many children living on the…

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Clarice Lispector, True to Her Wild Essence

Translated  by Marvin Najarro  This text belongs to Las Insurrectas series The great Clarice Lispector has turned 100.  The amazing writer who never believed she was one; plenty of purity in her soul to walk through life with the arrogance of the intelligentsia. Her texts made their way amid the intricacies of daily life, with the typewriter on her lap while keeping an eye on her young children. The appropriate room of which Virginia Woolf speaks was for Clarice that typewriter that saved her from the void.  Clarice, who grew up in poverty, an emigrant since she was a child, who…

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